Brand Politics Survey: Political Statements Slightly More Likely to Help Brands Than to Hurt

As the election draws nearer, some companies and brands may be contemplating weighing in on certain candidates and issues. While some have made obvious missteps, like KitchenAid’s accidental tweet during last week’s debate, others may make statements in more subtle ways. But how many Americans pay attention to brand politics and the groups and issues that different companies support? And how can these stances help or hurt businesses?

brand politics

Taking Stances

In Ask Your Target Market’s latest survey, 16% said they are definitely more likely to support a brand if it supports the same political candidate or issue they support. 37% said they are somewhat more likely to support brands that support the same political candidates and/or issues. And 47% said they are not more likely to support any brands based on their political stances.

On the other hand, 16% of consumers said they are definitely less likely to support a brand if that brand supports a political issue or candidate they don’t like. 29% said they are somewhat less likely to support brands that support political issues or candidates they don’t support. And 55% said they would not be less likely to support any brands based on their political stances.

Smart Business

Though consumers might be slightly more likely to support brands based on their political stances than they are to stay away from certain companies, just 4% of respondents said they definitely think that it is a smart decision for brands to weigh in on politics. And 11% said they think it is mostly a good idea for brands to weigh in on politics. 43% said they think it is usually a bad idea for brands to take stances on political issues. And another 43% said they think it is definitely a bad idea for brands to weigh in on politics.

Brand Research

But not all brands might publicly state what candidates or issues they support, if any. Some may simply work with or contribute money to certain candidates, causes or groups. And just 5% of Americans said they always research the groups or individuals the brands they support are affiliated with. 11% said they do research on the brands they support most of the time. 14% said they research brand affiliations about half the time. 34% said they rarely research the brands they support. And 38% said they never research the groups or causes the brands they support are affiliated with.

You can view the complete survey results in the widget below and be sure to click “Open Full Report” to take advantage of all the chart and filter options.

Photo Credit: Democratic Party Branding Launch from Flickr

What do you want to know? If you need some consumer insights on a particular topic, let us know in the comments below and we’ll consider it for an upcoming survey post.

Results were collected on October 7 via AYTM’s online survey panel.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Anne Pilon
Anne Pilon brings 3 years experience to AYTM as a blogger and journalist. She has a degree in journalism and marketing communications from Columbia College in Chicago and enjoys writing about business, marketing, social media, and art.